PARKS &
RECREATION

 

OHIO HERB EDUCATION CENTER

110 Mill Street, Gahanna, OH 43230

Office: 614-342-4380

HERB CAPITAL OF OHIO

The Herb Center is located in the City of Gahanna — the Herb Capital of Ohio — just east of downtown Columbus and adjacent to Port Columbus International Airport in the heart of Gahanna. The Nafzger-Miller house, in which the Herb Center is located, is listed in the National Register of Historical Places with the original structure being built in 1855 and additions made to the home in 1910. The center includes a gift shop, parlor and kitchen and is used for classes, parties, meetings and rentals.

HISTORY

Gahanna was declared the Herb Capital of Ohio by the state legislature in 1972. Jane “Bunnie” Geroux spearheaded the effort and later founded the Ohio Herb Education Center. In celebration of this great distinction, the Gahanna Municipal Gardens were installed next to city hall, at 206 S. Hamilton Road, in 1975. They were officially dedicated and named the Geroux Herb Garden in 2002. The gardens are open to the public.

Building on our mission to educate the public about the benefits and various uses of herbs in everyday life, the Ohio Herb Education Center offers a variety of learning opportunities. Whether you are looking for new culinary twists, in-depth gardening advice, wellness information or ideas on how to use your herbs, we offer programs that inspire you to try something new.

Explore our current list of preregistered programs:

  • Workshops– one-time sessions on a single topic that rotate seasonally
  • Intensives– a series of classes that allow participants to delve into specific areas of herb education

Create a custom herbal program for your group:

  • Experiences– select an herbal theme to explore and let us lead you through a hands-on activity
  • Speaking– invite one of our knowledgeable speakers to come to your venue for an in-depth presentation

To register for a workshop today click here!

UNIQUE HERBAL EXPERIENCES

The Ohio Herb Education Center is located in the City of Gahanna, the Herb Capital of Ohio, just east of downtown Columbus and adjacent to Port Columbus. As head of the Herbal Trail, we can create an herbal experience that your group will not forget. For more information on what Gahanna has to offer, visit the Gahanna Visitors Bureau. Plan your visit today!

HERB TALKS

Teas, Tonics & Elixirs
Sometimes the right combination of herbs and liquids can create a not only a healthy drink but a tasty beverage too. This class will simplify the complex art of brewing herbal teas. Learn new techniques like infusions and decoctions; understand what makes a tonic different than a tea and when to brew one or the other. Discover the allure surrounding elixirs.

Thyme for Fun in the Kitchen
Herbs can be the signature part of a culinary experience with their sweet, tart, and pungent flavors. Discover the fun facts about popular kitchen blends such as Herbs de Provence. Learn new ways to enhance every day recipes with herbals salts, sugars, butters and simple syrups. Participants come away inspired to create their own culinary creations using herbs.

Cleaning – The Herbal Way
Receive herbal “eco friendly” ideas for cleaning your home. Natural cleaning products made right in your own home provide better indoor air quality, greatly reduce the use of toxic products, and help save money. Learn how to make your own home-made soft scrub, herbal laundry aids, window cleaner, and herbal air fresheners.

The Symbolic Language of Herbs
Before texting, emails and even phones, people used to communicate with plant bouquets. Floriography, the language of flowers, was a practice that focused specific meanings and messages in the arrangement and with particular flowers and herbs. We will discuss the history of this practice and how it has been transformed through the ages, particularly by the Victorian era. Learn the secret messages of some of our favorite garden herbs.

Sacred Herbs of the Bible 
Herbs have been a part of human life since the dawn of civilization. They had a seamless integration in all aspects of family life, as food, medicine and in ritual. One can find them in several passages in the Bible, illustrating the themes and stories. In this lecture we will learn about the spiritual link that Rosemary, Hyssop, Spikenard, Dill and Lavender all contributed to our past and how they can be significant additions to our modern lifestyle.

Cost: $12.50 per person per 45 minute-1 hour; 6 person minimum
1 1/2 hour and 2 hour demonstrations available, please call for details.

HANDS-ON HERB CRAFT
This hands-on craft allows participants to experience how easy it is to incorporate herbs into a simple take home product. Each craft is themed to match the related experiential workshop.

Cost: $4 per person; 6 person minimum

Contact the Herb Center at 614.342.4380.

AN HERB SHOP DEDICATED TO ALL THINGS HERBAL

The Ohio Herb Education Center gift shop has that unique gift for the herb lover in your life. Inside you will find local honeys, custom selected teas, custom scented candles, tea presses and tea accessories. Our books are a selection of great resources on herb gardening, cooking, and herb craft.

VENDORS
Aimees Blue Ribbon Spices, Mockingbird Meadows Herbal Health Farm, Black Radish Creamery, Sweet Thing Gourmet, For Life Design, Herbal Sage Tea Company, Jane Inc., North Market Spices, Urban Moonshine, Woman’s Work, Honey Grove Botanicals, Gourmet Farm Girl, Jorgensen’s Farm, Mountain Rose Herbs, Root and Willow, Brother Veterans, Root 23, Champaign Paper, Earth Philosophy, Lather Rinse Repeat, Little City Love, Nature’s Magic, The Onyx Exchange, Sen Cha Naturals, Storehouse Tea Company, Under Aurora

RENTING THE NAFZGER-MILLER 1910 PARLOR

Looking for a unique space to hold your next event? Consider the Ohio Herb Education Center’s parlor. Suitable for parties of 20-25 people, this historic space offers the options of three refinished round tables, two porches and a kitchen. Our Herb Center Rental Brochure contains photos and detailed information.
For $15.00 the Ohio Herb Education Center can supply insulated cups and hot/iced tea of your choice for your event.

Call 614.342.4380 for reservations.
Herb Center Parlor Rental Forms are available for information on rental policies and rates.

Ohio Herb Education Center Rental Fee Schedule:

Suggested parlor capacity 20
maximum is 25 people
3-Hour Rental
Monday-Thursday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
3-Hour Rental
Friday-Sunday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
 Gahanna Resident Rate (RDR)  $105 $35 $150 $50
 Standard Rate $150 $50  $225 $75
 Additional Services
 Herbal Tea $15 $15

RENTING THE NAFZGER

MILLER 1910 PARLOR

Looking for a unique space to hold

your next event? Consider the Ohio

Herb Education Center’s parlor.

Suitable for parties of 20-25 people,

this historic space offers the options

of three refinished round tables,

two porches and a kitchen.

Our Herb Center Rental Brochure 

contains photos and detailed information.

For $15.00 the Ohio Herb Education

Center can supply insulated cups and

hot/iced tea of your choice for your event.

Call 614.342.4250 for reservations.
Herb Center Parlor Rental Forms 

are available for information on rental

policies and rates.

Ohio Herb Education Center

Rental Fee Schedule:

Suggested parlor capacity 20
maximum is 25 people
3-Hour Rental
Monday-Thursday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
3-Hour Rental
Friday-Sunday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
 Gahanna Resident Rate (RDR)  $105 $35 $150 $50
 Standard Rate $150 $50  $225 $75
 Additional Services
 Herbal Tea $15 $15

The Herb Center is located in the City of Gahanna — the Herb Capital of Ohio — just east of downtown Columbus and adjacent to the John Glenn Columbus International Airport in the heart of Gahanna. The Nafzger-Miller house, in which the Herb Center is located, is listed in the National Register of Historical Places with the original structure being built in 1855 and additions made to the home in 1910. The center includes a gift shop, parlor and kitchen and is used for classes, parties, meetings and rentals.

VOLUNTEER
Sign up to volunteer by contacting our volunteer coordinator at herb.center@gahanna.gov.

NEW FALL INTENSIVE PROGRAMS

Intensive Information Sessions:
If you are considering one of our intensive series classes but are unsure which one is the best fit for you, consider attending one of our free information sessions. We will discuss the details of each program, answer questions, and meet instructors and past participants. Free to attend. No Registration Required. Begins promptly at 6:30 pm.

Dates: Tuesdays, July 11 or August 15, 6:30 pm

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

“I was enthralled by the class and the amazing presentation and vast knowledge of the instructor.”

Herbal Wellness Kit participant

“A hidden ‘gem’. I was so excited that something like this exists.”

Herbal Spa Day participant

Frequently Asked Questions

Interested in renting the parlor at the Ohio Herb Education Center?

Rental includes 3 hours in the parlor, onsite employee for questions and access to the kitchen and porches. Suggested parlor capacity is 20. The maximum capacity is 25 people.

Want to rent the parlor for longer than 3 hours?

Purchase additional hours at rates listed above.

What about set up and clean up?

You must set up and clean up within your purchased rental time. The herb center cannot accept or store drop off items prior to rental time.

Do you have additional services?

Yes, for a small fee the Ohio Herb Education Center can supply insulated cups and hot/iced tea of your choice for your event. We do not provide food or serving staff.

What about decorations?

Parlor rental includes 20-25 chairs and three wooden round tables: (2) four-foot and (1) five-foot. Please provide your own linens, place settings and decorations. The plate railings can be used to hold framed photos and artwork. Due to the historical nature of the house decorations cannot be taped to walls or woodwork. Open flame is also prohibited. Please refer to Rental Policies for more details.

Will the shop be closed/open during my rental?

Privacy doors will be used during business hours when the shop is open. Please contact the staff person on duty if you or your guests would like to purchase items from the shop.

Is there a special rate for long-term rentals?

Please contact 614-342-4380 for more information. All requests must be approved by the Director of Parks & Recreation.

Connect with the Ohio Herb Center

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Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra – try saying that five times fast!) is a perennial herb in the Pea Family. Growing to 3’ high on straight stems, the plant has light green compound leaves and small pale purple flowers. Licorice is grown for its root, which is rich in aromatic flavor compounds, as well as glycyrrhizin, a compound that is 30-50 times sweeter than sugar. When used in candy, licorice is often paired with anise seed and mint, which combine to create the flavor most people recognize as licorice. Ironically, the majority of commercially grown licorice is used to flavor tobacco products! Licorice has long been valued for soothing coughs, sore throats and irritated stomachs. The root may be chewed directly, or brewed into a (very) sweet tea. It has also been used as a flavor component in root beer. ... See MoreSee Less

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Marshmallow (Althea officinalis) is a perennial flower that grows at edges of marshes and bogs. A member of the Mallow Family (Malvaceae), it is has flowers that resemble hibiscus and hollyhock, and is related to okra, cotton and chocolate. The Latin “malva” means soft, and members of this family are often rich in mucilage, a fibrous starch that attracts and retains moisture. Mucilage has long been used to soothe mucous membranes in the body, especially in the respiratory and digestive systems. Marshmallow was cooked and eaten by the ancient Romans, made into a delicacy for royalty by the Egyptians, and grown medicinally in Medieval monasteries. Somewhere along the way, a recipe that combined boiled marshmallow root with herbally infused syrup was developed as a way to make it easier for children to take medicine. This early version eventually led to the modern confection. ... See MoreSee Less

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This week in Herb Group we discussed the ceremonial importance of Mugwort. Curious?

During October we tend to start turning inward and begin the process of letting go of things that no longer serve us. Herbs and incense have played a part in this ritual for a long, long time. If you want to learn more, join us at the end of the month.
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Sacred Smoke: An Exploration of Incense

October 28, 2017, 1:00pm - October 28, 2017, 1:30pm

Incense has been used for millennia in sacred rituals, for healing, to purify the air, set a mood, and to simply enjoy the luxurious aromas captured in the smoke. In this class, we will learn the basi...

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Elecampane (Inula helenium) is a lovely, golden, summer-blooming flower in the Aster Family. Growing in tall, stiff stems to a height of 3-5’ with dark green leaves that are silvery beneath, the plant prefers full sun and moisture retentive soils, though its taproot will allow it to withstand drought. This root is rich in sweet fibrous starches (the best known is inulin), mucilage and bitter saponins. These compounds have made elecampane a popular traditional remedy for coughs and chest congestion, as well as digestive complaints. The root may be used fresh or dried (or even powdered), and may be made into a tea or syrup, and sometimes it is candied into drops. ... See MoreSee Less

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Do you want to learn more about essential oils and how to use them properly and safely? Then join us next Saturday. ... See MoreSee Less

Aromatherapy Foundations Class

October 14, 2017, 11:00am - October 14, 2017, 11:00am

Come to a relaxed, informative class about essential oils. Learn safety, dilutions, applications, and recipes. We will discuss how to research any essential oil you may have or buy, and how to use the...

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Astragalus (Astragalus membranaceus), also known as milkvetch, or huang qi in Chinese, is a flowering perennial in the Pea Family native to northern China. After the plant has matured to an age of 4 or 5 years, the root is harvested, dried and sliced. One of the 50 fundamental herbs in traditional Chinese medicine, it has been used for centuries in Asia, and has become popular as a slightly sweet herbal root in Western cultures as well. The plant is believed to support wellness and the immune system, and makes a wonderful addition to chai teas, where it complements the anti-inflammatory qualities of the spices. Slices of the dried root may also be added to soups and stews in the fall, where it will impart a mildly sweet flavor similar to other root vegetables such as carrots or parsnips. ... See MoreSee Less

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Burdock (Arctium lappa) is a biennial herb in the Aster Family. Its enormous leaves can grow to be 2 feet across or more, but the plant is best known for its roots and seeds. Burdock’s tap root can reach up to 3 feet long, and is harvested in the plant’s second year. The root is rich in fiber and minerals, including iron, calcium and potassium, and in traditional herbalism is considered a blood purifier. Cooked as a root vegetable, it’s sharp and slightly sweet flavor is delicious in stir fry. Burdock’s seeds, which are large prickly burrs, are considered to be protective wards in some cultures, and are said to have inspired the invention of Velcro! ... See MoreSee Less

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Since it's getting colder at night, you can expect a spicy herbal delight and a new take on chai at tomorrow night's Tea Circle. ... See MoreSee Less

Herbal Tea Circle

October 4, 2017, 7:00pm - October 4, 2017, 7:00pm

Join us for an informal evening of tea and herbal discussion. We will sample a featured tea or blend, and enjoy a light refreshment with an herbal twist, spending the hour discussing whatever herbal t...

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Every year, October marks a turning. Weather gets colder, and we usually see the first freeze, if not the first snow. The end of the harvest is brought in: it is time to start stocking up. In the herbal year, this is the season to harvest roots. Plants have finished generating their own stores for the winter, and have drawn them down into the earth for safekeeping until the following year. Once top growth has ended and begun to die back, this is the time to collect what the plants provide for the dark winter days. Join us this month in an exploration of the magic of herbal roots! ... See MoreSee Less

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