Income Tax Update

As a reminder, the passage of the income tax increase, Issue 12 in May, also changed the credit from 83.33% to 100% effective July 1, 2019. Upon receiving your 3rd and 4th quarter statement to pay your estimated income tax, you may want to contact your tax preparer or RITA customer service to determine if your estimate needs to be adjusted based on the credit change. You can reach RITA customer service by calling 1-800-860-7482.

Parking Restrictions on Crack Seal Streets

Gahanna residents that reside on the crack seal streets listed below will see parking restrictions immediately.  The restrictions will be in place until the the road maintenance is complete.  Work is expected to be completed in approximately three weeks, weather permitting.

Affected Streets:

Allanby Ct (Hamilton Rd to End of Ct)

Brookhill Dr (Glenhurst Ct to Highmeadow Dr)

Caro Ln (Caroway Blvd to End of Ct)

Colony Pl (Invicta Pl to End of Ct)

Creighton Ct (Ridenour Rd to End of Ct)

Crossing Creek Dr (Deer Meadow Dr to Trapp Dr)

Crownhill Ct (Lincolnshire Rd to Lincolnshire Rd)

Dark Star Ave (Riva Ridge Blvd to Venetian Way)

Denison Ct (Denison Ave to End of Ct)

Eastchester Dr (Eastchester Ct to S End of Ct)

Haversham Ct N (Haversham Dr to End of Ct)

Haversham Ct S (Whicham Way to End of Ct)

Invicta Pl (Andalus Dr to Colony Pl)

McDonell Pl (Ainsworth Ave to End of Ct)

Milan Dr (Andalus Dr to Heil Dr)

N Hamilton Rd (US62 to Stoneridge Ln)

N High St (Granville St to Carpenter Rd)

Parliament Ave (Uxbridge Ave to Theori Ave)

Picadilly Ct (Uxbridge Ave to End of Ct)

Ridge Crest Dr (Ridge Crest to Ridge Crest)

Rivers End Rd (Rocky Fork Dr to Rocky Fork Dr)

Savern Pl (Havens Corners Rd to End of Ct)

Stedway Ct (Whickham Way to End of Ct)

Sycamore Mill Dr (Millwood Ct to Clotts Rd)

Technology Ct (Taylor Station Rd to End of Ct)

Torch Ct (Uxbridge Ave to End of Ct)

Trafalgar Ct (Watling Rd to End of Ct)

Watling Rd (Stygler Rd to Moorfield Dr)

Windbourne St (Bluestem Ave to Shaker Dr)

New Online Rental Property Registration Forms

The City has adopted Ord 0053-2018 which requires all owners of residential rental properties located in the City to register each rental property annually. You can find the new registration forms on Gahanna’s website: https://www.gahanna.gov/zoning-and-code-enforcement/.  Please contact the Zoning Clerk at 614-342-4025 or via email for assistance in the application process.

 

New Carts Create Opportunity to Get Recycling Right

Now that you have your new, larger recycling cart, you can put your best environmental foot forward by putting only accepted items in your recycling bin. When you recycle right, you protect the environment, preserve landfill space and help to create and support employment opportunities in Gahanna and across Franklin County.

The amount of waste being generated by Franklin County residents and businesses is staggering. In fact, last year, 2.1 million tons of waste were generated by residents and businesses – enough to fill Ohio Stadium four times. And even though nearly half of that material is being recycled or composted, over one million tons of waste still finds its way to Franklin County’s landfill every year. Recycling has never been more important.

When it comes to using your new blue bin – don’t just recycle. Recycle Right!

There are a number of items, like yogurt cups, plastic and foam food containers, plastic bags and wire hangers that many people think are recyclable in their curbside bin but really aren’t.  And improper items can cause serious delays and added expense to the recycling process.

In Franklin County, only five items are accepted for recycling:

  • Paper and Cardboard
  • Plastic Bottles and Jugs
  • Glass Bottles and Jars
  • Metal Cans
  • Cartons

Everything else should be reused, donated, composted or disposed of safely.

It’s also important that recyclable items are prepared correctly.  Cardboard boxes should be broken down and recyclables should be kept loose in the bin – not bagged.

Why does all of this matter?

Proper recycling helps a lot more than the environment. Fewer resources earmarked for landfills means more resources available for well-paying community jobs.  Reusing and recycling materials also creates opportunities for new product innovations and technologies.

Make a Difference.

Gahanna and SWACO want to make recycling right as easy as possible for you so you’ll be receiving helpful recycling reminders and information in the mail.

If you want more details on our campaign to Recycle Right, you can also visit https://www.gahanna.gov/refuse-recycling-and-yard-waste/

Together, we can improve both the environment and the economy for Gahanna in ways that will pay off for years to come.

 

Tax Update

Update:

Effective July 1st, the city’s income tax rate will increase from 1.5% to 2.5%. The credit will increase from 83 1/3% to 100%.

For more information:

See the Rita Tax & Credit Increase Notification or call RITA Customer Service at the phone numbers below:

Individuals: 1.800.860.7482, ext. 5002

Businesses: 1.800.860.7482, ext. 5003

 

Lighting of the Sanctuary Bell Tower

Thanks to The Gahanna Foundation Inc. and more than 50 gracious donors; the Gahanna Sanctuary Bell Tower is glowing!

“The historic 1895 Gothic-style bell tower atop the Gahanna Sanctuary instantly became Gahanna’s newest and brightest landmark after successfully lighting it this past weekend in time for this year’s Creekside Blues and Jazz Festival,” said John Michael Spinelli, President of The Gahanna Foundation Inc. He added, “The architectural feature that helped earn the building being listed on The National Register of Historic Places in 1987 will now help growing Gahanna outshine the competition every night for years to come.”

Speaking on behalf of the trustees of The Gahanna Foundation and the more than 50 pioneer donors that included individuals and businesses who helped turn dreams promised into dreams delivered, Spinelli said, “I am pleased to say that our flagship project demonstrates how ‘civic minds can fashion the future’ for growing communities like Gahanna that want to distinguish themselves from the pack in fun and fruitful ways.”

The Gahanna Foundation Inc. was formed as a 501c3 charity late last July, raising nearly $8,500 since then to pay for the lighting project undertaken by Chris Apfelstadt, President of Light Up Columbus, central Ohio’s premier lighting company. You can learn more by visiting https://thegahannafoundation.org/.

Planning for a dedication ceremony in July for the project is underway.

View more photos of the shining Bell Tower in the gallery below:

GAHANNA AND RITA RESOLVE TAXPAYER LAWSUIT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Brian Metzbower

Brian.metzbower@gahanna.gov

GAHANNA AND RITA RESOLVE TAXPAYER LAWSUIT

Damages to be paid from carry-over reserves accumulated from prudent spending and City will continue to seek reimbursement from insurance carrier

[GAHANNA, OHIO, May 13, 2019] A lawsuit brought by the law firm of Allen, Stovall, Neuman, Fisher & Ashton LLP against the City of Gahanna and the Regional Income Tax Authority (RITA) is now resolved, with city council tonight approving an ordinance to adopt an agreed resolution.

The resolution was reached after months of intense negotiation and it ensures that the city will be able to reduce its legal costs and expenses, while bringing closure for many residents affected by the lawsuit.

The City of Gahanna’s Legal Counsel for the lawsuit Frank Reed said “this matter involving multiple parties has been litigated for years and while RITA and Gahanna may have eventually prevailed in court, the estimated costs of another three to five years of litigation could have potentially resulted in an additional nine million dollars.”

Reed further stated that in his talks with RITA, the city, and counsel for the plaintiffs, it was clear there was momentum for an agreed resolution.

“The city is ready to move forward and this resolution closes that chapter while allowing the city to focus on the future,” Reed said. “This is a responsible decision and I know city leaders look forward to re-focusing on efforts to continue making Gahanna a great place to live, work and raise a family.”

The City of Gahanna’s portion of the damages will be paid from carry-over reserves accumulated from prudent spending from prior years. In addition, the city will continue to seek reimbursement from its insurance company that provides insurance for errors and omissions coverage for the City of Gahanna.

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It’s Mosquito Season – Learn How to Protect Yourself from West Nile Virus

The City of Gahanna has contracted with Franklin County Public Health (FCPH) for mosquito control. FCPH uses an Integrated Pest Management approach with a public health focus to reduce and control disease carrying mosquitoes. Various tools and techniques are utilized throughout the mosquito season to help control the mosquito population. These include:

  • Larviciding areas of stagnant water and stormwater catch basins to prevent mosquitoes from hatching in these prime breeding sites.
  • Surveillance of adult mosquito populations by setting traps weekly throughout the county.
  • Testing of adult mosquitoes for the presence of disease.
  • Adulticiding (spraying) using Ultra Low Volume (ULV) truck-mounted equipment to treat residential areas to reduce adult mosquito populations.
  • Implementing a variety of educational materials and awareness approaches.

Franklin County Public Health uses the data they collect from these methods along with historical data about mosquito breeding locations, areas that traditionally have high adult mosquito populations and the frequency and distribution of mosquito-borne diseases throughout Franklin County to concentrate and focus their efforts. They also rely on residents to report areas that they suspect may be mosquito breeding areas and/or when there is an increase in adult mosquito activity.

TRAPPING AND TESTING
Mosquitoes are an all too familiar summer nuisance. They are not only annoying, but also present a potential health risk as transmitters of diseases such as encephalitis and West Nile virus. During mosquito season, FCPH will set a variety of traps weekly throughout the county to trap and identify different species of mosquitoes which have the potential to carry mosquito-borne diseases.

Gravid traps attract culex mosquitoes, which have the potential to carry West Nile virus. West Nile virus can be transmitted to people through the bite of an infected mosquito. Symptoms include mild fever, headache and body aches, often with skin rash and swollen lymph glands. Eighty percent of people bitten by an infected mosquito will not show any symptoms at all. Less than one percent of those who do have symptoms will become severely ill. In 2017, there were no human cases of WNV in Franklin County and only one in 2016. Franklin County had three human cases in 2015.

CDC light traps attract a wide variety of mosquitoes including Aedes Triseriatus mosquitoes. These mosquitoes have the potential to carry La Crosse encephalitis virus. Severe disease occurs most often in children under the age of 16. Many people infected with La Crosse encephalitis virus have no apparent symptoms. Among people who become ill, initial symptoms include fever, headache, nausea, vomiting and tiredness. Some of those who become ill develop severe neuro-invasive disease (disease that affects the nervous system). Severe La Crosse encephalitis virus often involves encephalitis (an inflammation of the brain) and can include seizures, coma and paralysis. The last case of La Crosse encephalitis virus in Franklin County was in 2011.

BG sentinel traps attract Aedes Albopictus mosquitoes. These mosquitoes have the potential to carry zika virus, chikungunya and yellow fever. While some of these types of mosquitoes are found in our area, there is no sign that those diseases are being carried in the community.

SPRAYING
Spraying will be determined and scheduled based on an increase in the number of disease-carrying mosquitoes, presence of West Nile virus in mosquitoes, history of West Nile virus in an area, weather events or patterns contributing to an increase in mosquito populations, when attempts to control populations through larviciding efforts are not effective, or there has been a locally acquired human case of West Nile virus. Franklin County Public Health will begin incorporating more Organic Materials Review Institute (OMRI) listed pesticides into the mosquito management program. When a pesticide is OMRI listed, it means that it can be applied on and near organic crops. A variety of OMRI listed larvicides will be used along with OMRI adulticide in the truck mounted sprayers.

If there is a need to treat a specific area in Gahanna, pre-spray maps will be featured on the City of Gahanna’s website prior to treatment. Residents have the option to sign up for email spray notifications so that you can plan outdoor activities, bring pets inside and close the doors and windows until after the spray truck has passed. Alternatively, Franklin County Public Health maintains a Do Not Spray registry of residents who do not want to have their property treated for adult mosquitoes through the use of truck-mounted spraying on public roadways and alleys. FCPH will make a good faith effort to shut off truck-mounted spraying equipment within approximately 150 feet of a registered property. This registry will be rendered inactive if the Health Commissioner declares a public health emergency where treatment is indicated. In the event of a public health emergency, FCPH will attempt to contact members of the registry prior to treatment of their property.

REQUEST FOR SERVICE AND REPORTING
Call the FCPH Mosquito Bite Line at 614-525-BITE (2483) to submit a request for service or to report mosquito problems or concerns. The Bite Line is a voicemail system so please leave a detailed message. All submissions will be processed in the order received. FCPH will make an attempt to respond to reported mosquito problems or concerns within 24 to 48 hours. This may include a site visit to the location reported and/or telephone call to try and obtain further information.

BE A PART OF THE SOLUTION – WHAT YOU CAN DO
Mosquitoes lay their eggs in water, and thus many neighborhood mosquito problems likely come from water-filled containers located either on your property or nearby. It doesn’t take much water for mosquitoes to reproduce. Standing water is required for their young to hatch and develop. A single water-filled bucket can produce hundreds of biting mosquitoes. Although the adult mosquito’s life expectancy is not usually more than a few weeks, the female may lay several batches each containing several hundred eggs during her life. Once eggs are laid, a new crop of mosquitoes can hatch, grow and emerge from the water as adults in as little as one week.

Most disease-causing mosquitoes spend their entire lives near their container-breeding site. Anything that holds water is a potential breeding site for mosquitoes (flower pots, bird baths, tarps, trash cans, clogged gutters, wading pools, toys, mud puddles, unused tires, etc). It does not take much water and it does not take much time. By eliminating mosquito habitats around your home and taking simple precautions, you can reduce the mosquito population, lower your risk of mosquito-borne diseases and make your summer activities more enjoyable. Follow the tips below:

  • Empty, remove, cover or turn over any container that has the potential to hold water.
  • Change the water in wading pools, planters and bird baths weekly and store indoors when not in use.
  • Empty your pets watering dishes daily.
  • Make sure gutters and downspouts are free of leaves and debris and are properly draining.
  • Repair leaky pipes and outside faucets.
  • Properly dispose of old tires.
  • Drain or fill low areas on your property that hold water for more than five days.
  • Use sand to plug holes in trees where water can collect.
  • Remind or help neighbors to eliminate breeding sites on their property.
  • Keep window screens and screened doors in good condition so mosquitoes cannot enter the home.
  • Avoid being outdoors at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are most active.
  • When outside, wear light color clothing, long sleeves, long pants and socks. Mosquitoes can pierce tight clothing so be sure to wear loose-fitting clothing.
  • Avoid perfumes, colognes or other heavy scents that may attract mosquitoes.
  • Use insect repellent products containing active ingredients that have been registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for use as repellents applied to skin and clothing. Products containing DEET and Picaridin typically provide longer-lasting protection than others, but products containing Oil of Lemon Eucalyptus (PMD) also provide a reasonable amount protection. Always follow label directions when applying mosquito repellents and see if it is appropriate to apply to children, as some may have concentrations not suitable for small children.

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION AND FORMS
Visit Franklin County Public Health’s Mosquito Management Program homepage at https://mosquito.myfcph.org for more detailed information regarding the general biology of mosquitoes, eliminating mosquitoes from your home, repellent information, management plan, spraying details and more. Forms are also available online to report problems or concerns (request for service) and do not spray requests. You can also call the Mosquito Bite Line at 614-525-BITE (2483) or follow Franklin County Public Health on Facebook (Franklin County Public Health) and/or Twitter (FC_PublicHealth) to receive notifications regarding mosquitoes or mosquito spraying as it is scheduled.

Get Summer Ready with Parks & Rec Activities

Have you seen our new summer activity guide, The Current? It’s packed full of events and activities for everyone in the family. Get all the information you need for your pool membership, summer camp or time out on the Big Walnut Creek or our affordable 9-hole golf course.

Be sure to check out the 2018 Year in Review to learn about the three pillars of parks and recreation, how we connect our residents with recreation opportunities, and a look ahead to pending future projects. Download the PDF here or pick up your copy at Gahanna City Hall.

New Recycling Carts Will Help Gahanna “Recycle Right”

This spring Gahanna residents will receive an upgrade to their curbside recycling program. Beginning in late April, residents will receive newly wheeled, 64-gallon recycling carts, thanks in part to a grant from SWACO (Solid Waste Authority of Central Ohio) and a national nonprofit organization called The Recycling Partnership.

The new recycling carts provide residents many advantages over the current bins. Besides the fact that they’re much easier to take to the curb, they have a lid, which reduces litter on windy days, and the larger size makes it easier for residents to recycle more material. Wheeled carts also allow for automated collection to improve the safety of collection workers and greater efficiency, both of which benefit communities as they seek competitive bids for lower-cost recycling and waste-hauling services.

Before the carts arrive, Gahanna households will receive a postcard from SWACO notifying them that the new receptacles are on the way, tips on how to best utilize this tool and answers to frequently asked questions.

Residents who currently use the red bins have the option to retain them. These bins can be repurposed and used to supplement recycling efforts in their home or garage. Once the new carts arrive, residents will have the option to leave their old bins at the curb for pick up during their scheduled recycle pick up day.

As part of the upgrade to the new carts, residents will receive information about how to “Recycle Right.” This information emphasizes that there are five types of materials that are accepted for recycling in Franklin County:

  • Paper and cardboard (remember to flatten boxes)
  • Plastic bottles and jugs (leave on the lids and labels)
  • Glass bottles and jars (all colors)
  • Metal cans (aluminum cans, soup cans, empty aerosol cans, etc.)
  • Cartons (milk cartons, juice boxes, broth cartons, rinse and remove the lids and straws)

As a reminder – be sure to leave the materials loose in your cart – do not bag your materials. Anything that is not on the list above should not be put in your recycling cart.

For more information about this new partnership visit  SWACO at www.recycleright.org.