Ohio Means Jobs to Host Meetings in Gahanna to Share Resources for Job Seekers

As part of Mayor Kneeland’s commitment to workforce development, the City will be promoting various events and activities to help connect Gahanna residents with resources and job opportunities. Ohio Means Jobs will be hosting informational meetings at the Gahanna Branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library, 310 Granville St. From 9 – 11 am on the following dates:

  • Tuesday, February 5
  • Tuesday, March 5

The purpose of these meetings is to introduce Ohio Means Jobs services to job seekers throughout central Ohio.  No appointment is necessary and the services are FREE. As a resource, the library provides FREE access to its computers with Internet access and resume software.

For more information about these events, contact the Gahanna Branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library at 614.645.2275. To learn about job opportunities in Gahanna and throughout central Ohio visit our workforce resource page.

Gahanna Among Those Communities Recognized by MORPC for Leading on Sustainability

The Mid-Ohio Regional Planning Commission (MORPC) has certified five local governments as the first set of Sustainable2050 communities to achieve an elevated status for their actions to promote sustainability.

Sustainable2050 is a program that supports communities’ sustainability efforts through direct technical assistance, collaboration, and recognition. Each member’s tier status is determined by the number of eligible activities it carries out in five categories corresponding to MORPC’s Regional Sustainability Agenda.

“These communities are dedicated to improving the quality of life of their residents in sustainable ways, and that should be celebrated,” MORPC Planning & Environment Director Kerstin Carr said. “Through Sustainable2050, we are not only recognizing their commitment to sustainability but ultimately assisting them, through access to resources, to do even more.”

Dublin, Gahanna, Genoa Township, Lockbourne, and Upper Arlington comprise the first five certified Sustainable2050 members, with each being designated as Bronze, Silver, Gold or Platinum status.

The City of Dublin completed 48 eligible activities across five categories, achieving the Platinum designation. Highlights from Dublin include:

  • A commitment to energy through its efforts to increase the percentage of fleet vehicles using alternative fuels
  • Efforts to minimize greenfield development through its innovative code and master plan for the Bridge Street District
  • A Green Purchasing Policy in place since 1998 to increase economic opportunity
  • The Dublin Bikeway Plan that was recognized as a tool the city uses to serve a higher number of residents and workers

The City of Gahanna completed 14 eligible activities in four categories, achieving the Silver designation. Highlights from Gahanna include:

  • Collaboration with private partners to host public alternative fuel stations
  • An innovative stormwater credit incentive that encourages implementation of green stormwater infrastructure and reduction of peak flow runoff

Genoa Township completed 16 eligible activities in four categories, achieving the Silver designation. Highlights from Genoa Township include:

  • Spreading the word about air quality, and promoting behavior change among its staff on Air Quality Alert days
  • A commitment to Sustainable Neighborhoods by prioritizing maintenance and improvements to its multipurpose trails such as the Genoa Trail, which is a Central Ohio Greenways route and part of the Ohio to Erie Trail.

The Village of Lockbourne completed 17 eligible activities in five categories, achieving the Silver designation. Highlights from Lockbourne include:

  • Actively reaching out to the community with information and education for its residents on air quality via social media and its Village View newsletter
  • Preserving sustainable neighborhoods by promoting available home weatherization services and programs to its residents

The City of Upper Arlington completed 43 eligible activities across five categories, achieving the Platinum designation. Highlights from Upper Arlington include:

  • A commitment to reducing the number of vehicle miles traveled, in part through its Complete Streets policy. It is one of only a handful of Central Ohio communities to have officially adopted a policy; theirs has been in place since 2014.
  • A zoning code and master plan that focus on infill opportunities, which help the city to minimize greenfield development
  • Promoting the Green Spot program, helping to increase the number of businesses and homes that carry out their own sustainability practices
  • A commitment to Sustainable Neighborhoods by prioritizing the number of people and jobs it serves through its bike and pedestrian infrastructure. The Upper Arlington bikeways continue to expand, removing bike and pedestrian network gaps within the community.

More than 30 local communities committed to work toward more sustainable practices through MORPC’s Sustainable2050 initiative, meaning more communities will be certified in the near future.

Additional information on the Sustainable2050 program can be found at morpc.org/sustainable2050.

 

Take the PUP Pledge and Help Us Protect Our Waterways

Did you know that during rain events, dog poop left on the ground can wash away through the sewer systems and end up in our lakes and rivers, polluting our freshwater supplies? The water that goes through these storm sewer systems is not treated, so what goes into a drain exits into our waterways.

The City of Gahanna is partnering with the Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District to help protect our waterways through its PUP campaign.  The Pick Up Poop (PUP) campaign encourages residents to clean up after their pets to protect our waterways and promote a healthy community.  Do your part by taking the Gahanna PUP Pledge at www.franklinswcd.org/franklin-county-pup-pledge

 

Report a Pothole

The City of Gahanna is responsible for maintaining residential streets, and portions of major arterials. To report a pothole or damage on a city-maintained roadway click here. You may also contact the Department of Public Service & Engineering at 614.342.4005.

 

West Side Intersection Improvement Alternatives Analysis Update

For those unable to attend any of the scheduled open houses concerning the West Side Intersection, we have provided a link to the materials disseminated outlining the proposed alternatives.  If you have additional questions or would like to provide feedback, please email the City Engineer Robert Priestas at robert.priestas@gahanna.gov.

City Buzzing with Enthusiasm for Bee City Projects

Original story by Marla Kuhlman, ThisWeek Community News

The buzz around Gahanna is that the city is officially a “Bee City USA.”

Gahanna landed the status after city council voted to pursue the program that helps communities recognize the importance of pollinators.

Residents can expect to see a variety of initiatives, including the installation and maintenance of three active beehives within the city.

Additionally, the city plans to landscape the newly opened roundabouts on Hamilton Road Central to create pollinator habitats.

Mayor Tom Kneeland signed a proclamation making Gahanna a pollinator-friendly community last spring.

The Bee City USA status reaffirms the city’s commitment to help create pollinator-friendly habitats that ensure the survival of animal species, such as bees, which improve regional food production and stimulate the local economy.

“I’m excited about the progress we have made from becoming a pollinator-friendly community to the Bee City USA status,” Kneeland said. “I encourage residents to look for ways in their own yards to create a pollinator-friendly habitat.”

Bee City USA is a nonprofit national organization that encourages communities to sustain pollinators by providing them with a healthy habitat, rich in a variety of native plants and free or nearly free of pesticides.

Some of the installations include gardens at McCorkle Park, Creekside Park and Plaza, the Geroux Herb Garden at Gahanna City Hall, Gahanna Swimming Pool and Veterans Memorial Park.

“When researching community ecological initiatives, I found Gahanna’s current practices to meet or exceed the requirements,” said Shannon Barnette, horticulture coordinator for the Department of Parks and Recreation. “Our city parks and local wildlife can benefit greatly from our ongoing efforts.”

The certification Gahanna received includes a requirement to annually celebrate being a Bee City USA community through public-awareness activities, including a proclamation, signs and web links; with the expectation to annually report activities to Bee City USA to renew the certification.

Gahanna plans to annually celebrate National Pollinator Week during the third week of June.

More information about Bee City USA can be found at www.beecityusa.org.

To learn more about Gahanna’s pollinator initiatives, contact the Ohio Herb Education Center at 614-342-4380.

Gahanna Spotlight: Actions of City, residents can help pollinators

Original article featured in ThisWeek Community News

By Mayor Tom Kneeland

On April 7, 2017, I proclaimed Gahanna a Pollinator Community.

Since then, the efforts put forth by our Department of Parks & Recreation have allowed the city to achieve the status of Bee City USA — the first central Ohio city to receive this recognition. In the last three months, the city has also joined the National Wildlife Federation-Mayor’s Monarch Pledge and the Ohio Pollinator Habitat Initiative, as well as celebrated our 28th year as a Tree City USA community.

Our parks division has made tremendous progress with several initiatives around the city, starting with removing invasive species such as honeysuckle, grapevine and privet that suppress the native species.

You may have seen the new planting bed behind Creekside Cafe which is now thriving with new native plants that provide crucial habitat for pollinators while controlling erosion. The wildflower prairies at Gahanna Woods are an all-year food source for a variety of pollinators including moths, birds, native bumblebees, butterflies and hummingbirds.

New micro-climate designs at the Geroux Herb Garden considered the soil, light and watering needs of the land and were paired with native plants and lesser-known herbs to reduce watering, provide for year-round food sources and color and, ultimately, require less maintenance.

Another initiative is the use of “low-mow zones” in Hannah, Friendship, Lower McCorkle, Gahanna Woods and Woodside Green Parks. Once established, the long-term benefits of these areas include stabilizing the soil to reduce erosion, slowing stormwater runoff and filtering pollutants such as fertilizers and pesticides that would have otherwise entered the groundwater or streams.

Fiscal savings to our taxpayers include lower maintenance costs of our green space with fewer hours of labor, less fuel and equipment wear and tear and a decrease of herbicides and fertilizers to maintain those areas.

As a Gahanna resident, I am looking forward to putting pollinator-friendly practices to work in my own yard.

Here are a few tips for attracting pollinators to your garden and flower beds this fall and protecting pollinators during the coldest months of the year.

* Keep tall, ornamental grasses free-standing. Native bees and butterflies will shelter here.

* If you must cut tall grasses, consider “chop and drop.” This creates a natural mulch that will protect perennials and give shelter to pollinators.

* Rake leaves into your flower beds to add good nutrients to your soil as a natural fertilizer and to provide shelter for native pollinators.

* Create natural bird feeders by keeping the seed heads on flowers.

* Plant bulbs for springtime flowers before the first frost.

* Research what pollinators you want to attract in the spring and summer then plan changes to your garden or landscape accordingly.

* Consider native species of plants and avoid many popular invasive species such as purple loosestrife. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources provides alternative to Ohio’s top invasive plant species at ohiodnr.gov/ invasiveplants.

* Take advantage of upcoming programs such as the Earthy Herbal Garden Series or the Beekeeper’s Year at the Ohio Herb Education Center (ohioherbcenter.org) to learn more.

These initiatives are fun, productive and environmentally friendly and I encourage residents and businesses to look for similar ways to be eco-friendly and help our natural pollinators. Their world is shrinking as ours is growing.

To learn more about our pollinator-friendly initiatives contact the  Ohio Herb Education Center at 614.342.4380.

Social Media Guide

Whether you are on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or YouTube, you can join the conversation about the City of Gahanna and our community. Below are a few guidelines to be mindful of when posting on the City’s social media platforms:

In order to maintain a respectful interaction on the City’s social media platforms, we encourage all content to:

  • Stay Focused.  All viewpoints are welcome, but comments should remain relevant to the social media platforms maintained by the City of Gahanna.
  • Be Respectful.​  Personal attacks, profanity, and aggressive language is prohibited.  Instigating arguments in a disrespectful manner is also prohibited on the City’s social media platforms.
  • Tell the truth.​  Purposefully providing false information, or the intent to mislead fans/followers is prohibited. If you have questions about information, please contact the appropriate City department or the Mayor’s office directly to get the facts before posting incorrect or misleading information on the City’s social media platforms.
  • No spam.​  Repeated posting of identical or very similar content advertising or promoting services or products on the City’s social media platforms is prohibited and is subject to removal.

Content posted may be subject to deletion if it contains:

  • Partisan political views or views of a political organization.
  • Commercial endorsements.
  • Discriminatory, racist, offensive, obscene, threatening, inflammatory, unlawful, or otherwise objectionable statements, language or content.
  • Content that advocates illegal activity.
  • Content that infringes on copyright or trademarks.
  • Personally identifiable medical information.

Explanation of deletion may be provided.

We reserve the right to block or delete offenders of this policy.

Please note that the content posted by fans/followers on our social media platforms does not reflect the opinions or position of the City of Gahanna or its employees.  If you have any questions concerning the operation of any of our moderated social media platforms, please contact the Public Information Manager at information@gahanna.gov/614.342.4043

Help Us Maintain a Pollinator Habitat in Gahanna!

This past spring Mayor Tom Kneeland signed a proclamation making Gahanna a Pollinator Community. This initiative is important because pollinators are threatened with a loss of habitat and food sources. A pollinator is any animal that visits plants and moves pollen. Bees and butterflies are among the most popular pollinators, but beetles, bats, flies, hummingbirds and moths are others. Pollinators are essential for human, animal and plant survival. We can thank pollinators for one out of every three bites of food we eat. As a Pollinator Community, the City of Gahanna is taking many steps to create pollinator-friendly habitats and to help ensure the survival of vital animal species, improve regional food production and stimulate the local economy.

The City’s Department of Parks & Recreation is renovating existing flower beds and planting perennial pollinator plant species to attract and support pollinator populations. Some of the installations include gardens at McCorkle Park, Creekside Park/Plaza, the Geroux Herb Garden at City Hall, Gahanna Swimming Pool and Veteran’s Plaza. The department also continues to remove invasive species like honeysuckle, privet and grapevine so native plants have space to grow. Pollinators and native species are adapted to one another making them a natural fit for pollinators to collect pollen and nectar.

Other forthcoming initiatives include the installation and maintenance of three active bee hives at various locations throughout. Also, the City plans to landscape the newly opened roundabouts on Hamilton Road in Gahanna to create pollinator habitats.

According to City of Gahanna Parks & Recreation Horticultural Coordinator, Shannon Barnett, homeowners, too, can take practical steps to create their own pollinator habitats like planting native species with a variety of colors and a broad range of bloom times throughout the season, so there is always a pollinator food source.

“Planting herbs in your yard or cultivating a small container herb garden is a great way to support a variety of pollinators,” said Brooke Sackenheim, manager at the City of Gahanna Ohio Herb Education Center. “Many of the culinary herbs such as thyme, basil and mint are delicious for people and at the same time nourishing to bees and butterflies.”

Growing herbs such as parsley, fennel and dill can also provide food for caterpillars, thus supporting important butterfly and moth pollinators. When several people in a neighborhood grow different kinds of herbs and flowering plants, it allows pollinators to have a variety of nutrition and shelter options available to them throughout the season. Starting with one small pot of rosemary can make a big difference for several kinds of pollinators.

This fall, consider leaving tall fountain grasses rather than trimming down and leave fallen leaves in flower beds. These areas will become natural nesting habitats for pollinators like the praying mantis.

Mayor Kneeland encourages all community groups, schools, and citizens to participate in activities promoting conservation and stewardship. To learn more about supporting pollinator environments, visit www.pollinator.org.

Join the City in helping to maintain a healthy pollinator habitat in Gahanna!