PARKS &
RECREATION

 

OHIO HERB EDUCATION CENTER

110 Mill Street, Gahanna, OH 43230

Office: 614-342-4380

LEARN

Building on our mission to educate the public about the benefits and various uses of herbs in everyday life, the Ohio Herb Education Center offers a variety of learning opportunities. Whether you are looking for new culinary twists, in-depth gardening advice, wellness information or ideas on how to use your herbs, we offer programs that inspire you to try something new.

Explore our current list of programs (preregistration is required):

Workshops
One-time sessions on a single topic that rotate seasonally. Check back quarterly or join our Facebook page or email mailing list.

Intensives
A series of classes that allow participants to delve into specific areas of herb education.

Herbal education is a lifelong study. Intensives are a series of classes providing a more immersive experience. Students study with the herb center staff as well as herb experts from around Ohio to learn botany, in depth herb profiles, herbal folklore and history, and culinary or wellness approaches. Moving beyond lecture, students also examine and experiment with herbs using multi-sensory techniques and learning practical, hands-on applications. Intensives courses require curiosity and commitment, but students find they gain a new and deeper understanding of herbs.

UNIQUE HERBAL EXPERIENCES

The Ohio Herb Education Center is located in the City of Gahanna, the Herb Capital of Ohio, just east of downtown Columbus and adjacent to Port Columbus. As head of the Herbal Trail, we can create an herbal experience that your group will not forget. For more information on what Gahanna has to offer, visit the Gahanna Visitors Bureau. Plan your visit today!

HERB TALKS

Teas, Tonics & Elixirs
Sometimes the right combination of herbs and liquids can create a not only a healthy drink but a tasty beverage too. This class will simplify the complex art of brewing herbal teas. Learn new techniques like infusions and decoctions; understand what makes a tonic different than a tea and when to brew one or the other. Discover the allure surrounding elixirs.

Thyme for Fun in the Kitchen
Herbs can be the signature part of a culinary experience with their sweet, tart, and pungent flavors. Discover the fun facts about popular kitchen blends such as Herbs de Provence. Learn new ways to enhance every day recipes with herbals salts, sugars, butters and simple syrups. Participants come away inspired to create their own culinary creations using herbs.

Cleaning – The Herbal Way
Receive herbal “eco friendly” ideas for cleaning your home. Natural cleaning products made right in your own home provide better indoor air quality, greatly reduce the use of toxic products, and help save money. Learn how to make your own home-made soft scrub, herbal laundry aids, window cleaner, and herbal air fresheners.

The Symbolic Language of Herbs
Before texting, emails and even phones, people used to communicate with plant bouquets. Floriography, the language of flowers, was a practice that focused specific meanings and messages in the arrangement and with particular flowers and herbs. We will discuss the history of this practice and how it has been transformed through the ages, particularly by the Victorian era. Learn the secret messages of some of our favorite garden herbs.

1 1/2 hour and 2 hour demonstrations available, please call for details.

HANDS-ON HERB CRAFT
This hands-on craft allows participants to experience how easy it is to incorporate herbs into a simple take home product. Each craft is themed to match the related experiential workshop.

Contact the Herb Center at 614.342.4380.

AN HERB SHOP DEDICATED TO ALL THINGS HERBAL

The Ohio Herb Education Center gift shop has that unique gift for the herb lover in your life. Inside you will find local honeys, custom selected teas, custom scented candles, tea presses and tea accessories. Our books are a selection of great resources on herb gardening, cooking, and herb craft.

VENDORS
Aimees Blue Ribbon Spices, Mockingbird Meadows Herbal Health Farm, Black Radish Creamery, Sweet Thing Gourmet, For Life Design, Herbal Sage Tea Company, Jane Inc., North Market Spices, Urban Moonshine, Woman’s Work, Honey Grove Botanicals, Gourmet Farm Girl, Jorgensen’s Farm, Mountain Rose Herbs, Root and Willow, Brother Veterans, Root 23, Champaign Paper, Earth Philosophy, Lather Rinse Repeat, Little City Love, Nature’s Magic, The Onyx Exchange, Sen Cha Naturals, Storehouse Tea Company, Under Aurora

RENTING THE NAFZGER-MILLER 1910 PARLOR

Looking for a unique space to hold your next event? Consider the Ohio Herb Education Center’s parlor. Suitable for parties of 20-25 people, this historic space offers the options of three refinished round tables, two porches and a kitchen. Our Herb Center Rental Brochure contains photos and detailed information.
For $15.00 the Ohio Herb Education Center can supply insulated cups and hot/iced tea of your choice for your event.

Call 614.342.4380 for reservations.
Herb Center Parlor Rental Forms are available for information on rental policies and rates.

Ohio Herb Education Center Rental Fee Schedule:

Suggested parlor capacity 20
maximum is 25 people
3-Hour Rental
Monday-Thursday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
3-Hour Rental
Friday-Sunday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
 Gahanna Resident Rate (RDR)  $105 $35 $150 $50
 Standard Rate $150 $50  $225 $75
 Additional Services
 Herbal Tea $15 $15

RENTING THE NAFZGER

MILLER 1910 PARLOR

Looking for a unique space to hold

your next event? Consider the Ohio

Herb Education Center’s parlor.

Suitable for parties of 20-25 people,

this historic space offers the options

of three refinished round tables,

two porches and a kitchen.

Our Herb Center Rental Brochure 

contains photos and detailed information.

For $15.00 the Ohio Herb Education

Center can supply insulated cups and

hot/iced tea of your choice for your event.

Call 614.342.4250 for reservations.
Herb Center Parlor Rental Forms 

are available for information on rental

policies and rates.

Ohio Herb Education Center

Rental Fee Schedule:

Suggested parlor capacity 20
maximum is 25 people
3-Hour Rental
Monday-Thursday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
3-Hour Rental
Friday-Sunday
Additional Rental
Time by the Hour
 Gahanna Resident Rate (RDR)  $105 $35 $150 $50
 Standard Rate $150 $50  $225 $75
 Additional Services
 Herbal Tea $15 $15

HERB CAPITAL OF OHIO

The Herb Center is located in the City of Gahanna — the Herb Capital of Ohio — just east of downtown Columbus and adjacent to Port Columbus International Airport in the heart of Gahanna. The Nafzger-Miller house, in which the Herb Center is located, is listed in the National Register of Historical Places with the original structure being built in 1855 and additions made to the home in 1910. The center includes a gift shop, parlor and kitchen and is used for classes, parties, meetings and rentals.

VOLUNTEER
Sign up to volunteer by contacting our volunteer coordinator at herb.center@gahanna.gov.

WHAT PEOPLE ARE SAYING

“I was enthralled by the class and the amazing presentation and vast knowledge of the instructor.”

Herbal Wellness Kit participant

“A hidden ‘gem’. I was so excited that something like this exists.”

Herbal Spa Day participant

Connect with Parks & Recreation

PARK UPDATE: The bridge construction at Pizzurro Park is almost complete, but unfortunately the park will remain closed until the weather cooperates and we can get a couple of nice days to wrap it up. Sorry for the inconvenience. ... See MoreSee Less

 

Comment on Facebook

Thanks for the update. We're anxious for it to reopen.

Is there a status update on the trail and bridge construction near McCorkle Park?

Be sure to check out our Facebook event listings as we’ve posted several new ones that require prior registration like Winter Break Camp, Yoga, and programs from Kinderdance, Tumblin4Kids, JumpBunch and Little Medical School.
Other events include information about our Visits with Santa and the annual Holiday Open House & Chorale Performance at the Senior Center.

www.facebook.com/pg/GahannaParksRec/events/
... See MoreSee Less

Be sure to check out our Facebook event listings as we’ve posted several new ones that require prior registration like Winter Break Camp, Yoga, and programs from Kinderdance, Tumblin4Kids, JumpBunch and Little Medical School.  
Other events include information about our Visits with Santa and the annual Holiday Open House & Chorale Performance at the Senior Center. 

https://www.facebook.com/pg/GahannaParksRec/events/

Mark your calendars for visits with Santa at the Herb Center on 12/8 and 12/15! Come spend the day with Santa and his helpers, making crafts and sharing your Christmas wish list! Click on the link for more details www.facebook.com/events/696332957379729/ ... See MoreSee Less

Mark your calendars for visits with Santa at the Herb Center on 12/8 and 12/15! Come spend the day with Santa and his helpers, making crafts and sharing your Christmas wish list! Click on the link for more details https://www.facebook.com/events/696332957379729/

 

Comment on Facebook

Susan Anyi Blackstone Santa pictures

Mark your calendars for the Senior Center's annual Christmas Open House on 12/12 featuring a spectacular performance by the GLHS Chorale! This event is FREE and open to members and non-members. Click on the link for more details www.facebook.com/events/286260451995111/ ... See MoreSee Less

Mark your calendars for the Senior Centers annual Christmas Open House on 12/12 featuring a spectacular performance by the GLHS Chorale! This event is FREE and open to members and non-members. Click on the link for more details https://www.facebook.com/events/286260451995111/

City Hall will be closed on Thursday, 11/22 & Friday, 11/23 in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday. We will resume normal business hours on Monday, 11/26. ... See MoreSee Less

City Hall will be closed on Thursday, 11/22 & Friday, 11/23 in observance of the Thanksgiving Holiday.  We will resume normal business hours on Monday, 11/26.
Load more

Connect with the Ohio Herb Center

Need a gift for a budding herbalist? Our herbal zines have you covered. We carry zines from Jess Krueger of Staghorn Herbs and Zines, Brittany Wood Nickerson of Thyme Herbal, and Raleigh Briggs. Small books and zines are a great way to get started on a journey with herbs. Stop into the shop and ask our staff for recommendations. We are open Monday-Friday 12-6pm and Saturday 12-4pm. ... See MoreSee Less

Need a gift for a budding herbalist?  Our herbal zines have you covered.  We carry zines from Jess Krueger of Staghorn Herbs and Zines, Brittany Wood Nickerson of Thyme Herbal, and Raleigh Briggs.  Small books and zines are a great way to get started on a journey with herbs.  Stop into the shop and ask our staff for recommendations.  We are open Monday-Friday 12-6pm and Saturday 12-4pm.

 

Comment on Facebook

Love Jess Krueger’s work!!

Herbal Almanac, Monday, December 10. Although the shortest day of the year is swiftly approaching, there is one group of plants that will continue as if nothing has changed: coniferous evergreens. These are the classic cone-bearing trees and shrubs, whose needle-like leaves remain on the plant year round, and for whom the continuous presence of chlorophyll means that photosynthesis may carry on. This adaptation allows these plants to exist even north of the Arctic Circle in some regions. It also means that they are available to us even in the depths of winter.

One of the main defenses that evergreens employ is sap thick with aromatic resins, which help fend off insect invaders. The sap is also rich in terpenes, aromatic compounds that are anti-microbial and beneficial to humans. It has been proposed that these aromatic compounds are one possible reason that forest bathing has clinical benefits.

Conifers are also rich in vitamin C, especially in the growing tips, and the needles make a delicious tea. When European settlers arrived after long trips at sea, suffering from scurvy, Native Americans taught them how to make this tea to heal.

Conifers infuse our holiday traditions. Evergreens have been revered as sacred back to ancient times, by groups as diverse as the Romans, the Celts and the Vikings. Their ability to maintain living energy and green leaves in the face of increasing darkness, was seen as a sign of strength, everlasting life and the promise of rebirth. Vikings put up evergreen wreaths over doors to guard against wandering evil spirits, set free by the diminishing sunlight. The ancient Germanic tribes would burn evergreen logs, now known as yule logs, to ward off the darkness and invite the sun to return. Bringing an entire tree into the house was thought to be particularly protective, and became the modern tradition of the Christmas tree.

Spruce trees are any member of the genus Picea, a coniferous evergreen group largely native to far northern reaches of North America, Europe and Siberia. They can grow anywhere from 80 to 200 feet tall, and form dense dark canopies in regions where few deciduous trees can compete, due to light and cold. The spiraled branches sprout new growth tips in the early spring, which are perfect for infusing into syrups or making into candy. More mature growth is rich in resins that are good for the skin, and work well in infused oils for balms and salves.

Pines are one of our best loved evergreens. The most common native pine in the eastern United States is the White Pine (Pinus strobus). They may live to be 400 years old or more, and grow to a height of over 200 feet if left undisturbed. Some Native Americans used the soft inner bark as a type of flour when times were hard especially in the winter, and some tribes were known to eat the sweet seeds found hidden in the cones.

Juniper is another evergreen well-loved at the holidays. Not only do the berries bring a citrusy spice to roasts, cranberry sauce and mulled wine, the evergreen branches are a common component in wreaths and holiday swag. In pagan times, branches and berries were burned to purify the air and drive off witches, and the custom was then carried into celebrations Christmas Eve and at the New Year. Native Americans used both the berries and inner bark of some juniper species as both food and medicine. Even the ancient Greeks believed that eating the berries would increase the stamina of athletes and soldiers.
... See MoreSee Less

Herbal Almanac, Monday, December 10. Although the shortest day of the year is swiftly approaching, there is one group of plants that will continue as if nothing has changed: coniferous evergreens. These are the classic cone-bearing trees and shrubs, whose needle-like leaves remain on the plant year round, and for whom the continuous presence of chlorophyll means that photosynthesis may carry on. This adaptation allows these plants to exist even north of the Arctic Circle in some regions. It also means that they are available to us even in the depths of winter. 

One of the main defenses that evergreens employ is sap thick with aromatic resins, which help fend off insect invaders. The sap is also rich in terpenes, aromatic compounds that are anti-microbial and beneficial to humans. It has been proposed that these aromatic compounds are one possible reason that forest bathing has clinical benefits. 

Conifers are also rich in vitamin C, especially in the growing tips, and the needles make a delicious tea. When European settlers arrived after long trips at sea, suffering from scurvy, Native Americans taught them how to make this tea to heal. 

Conifers infuse our holiday traditions. Evergreens have been revered as sacred back to ancient times, by groups as diverse as the Romans, the Celts and the Vikings. Their ability to maintain living energy and green leaves in the face of increasing darkness, was seen as a sign of strength, everlasting life and the promise of rebirth.  Vikings put up evergreen wreaths over doors to guard against wandering evil spirits, set free by the diminishing sunlight. The ancient Germanic tribes would burn evergreen logs, now known as yule logs, to ward off the darkness and invite the sun to return. Bringing an entire tree into the house was thought to be particularly protective, and became the modern tradition of the Christmas tree. 

Spruce trees are any member of the genus Picea, a coniferous evergreen group largely native to far northern reaches of North America, Europe and Siberia. They can grow anywhere from 80 to 200 feet tall, and form dense dark canopies in regions where few deciduous trees can compete, due to light and cold. The spiraled branches sprout new growth tips in the early spring, which are perfect for infusing into syrups or making into candy. More mature growth is rich in resins that are good for the skin, and work well in infused oils for balms and salves.

Pines are one of our best loved evergreens. The most common native pine in the eastern United States is the White Pine (Pinus strobus). They may live to be 400 years old or more, and grow to a height of over 200 feet if left undisturbed. Some Native Americans used the soft inner bark as a type of flour when times were hard especially in the winter, and some tribes were known to eat the sweet seeds found hidden in the cones.

Juniper is another evergreen well-loved at the holidays. Not only do the berries bring a citrusy spice to roasts, cranberry sauce and mulled wine, the evergreen branches are a common component in wreaths and holiday swag. In pagan times, branches and berries were burned to purify the air and drive off witches, and the custom was then carried into celebrations Christmas Eve and at the New Year. Native Americans used both the berries and inner bark of some juniper species as both food and medicine. Even the ancient Greeks believed that eating the berries would increase the stamina of athletes and soldiers.

This time of year, when the retreat of green foliage reveals the bones of our environment, and the usually hidden processes of damp decay, people start thinking about mushrooms. Technically, not being plants, mushrooms inhabit a gray area when it comes to the classic definition of herbs. But they are so rich in certain nutrients and nourishment that humans need (Vitamins B and D, potassium, selenium, polysaccharides and fiber), that they have been adopted into the herbal fold.

Mushrooms live by breaking down dead plant matter, especially wood, and need lots of moisture to carry out their work. Often a particular species of mushroom will have a favorite dead tree that it likes to eat. But the part that we see, harvest and eat are actually just the fruit of the larger organism that lives unseen below the surface of the soil. That part is a network of thin fibers called mycelium, which can grow to acres in size. Mushrooms have fruiting seasons, just like trees and perennials. Which season depends on the specific mushroom, and can be anytime from early spring (Morels) to mid-summer (Shiitake) to mid-autumn (Maitake). Some will re-fruit in later seasons, especially if year has been wet.

One of the benefits of eating mushrooms (which also makes them valuable going into cold weather), is their immune modulating properties. It doesn’t hurt that they taste so good in soups and other warm dishes like casseroles.

Maitake (Grifola frondosa), also known as Hen of the Woods. This species likes oaks, especially red, and can often be spied on forest hikes. It is prized by wild foragers, and makes a great addition to omelets, simmered in cream soups or simply sautéed. Maitake prefers cool wet weather for fruiting, so look for them early September through the fall, especially after rain.

Shiitake (Lintinula edodes), also called the Black Forest Mushroom, is a popular mushroom in kits. Native to Asia, it also grows in the wild in North America. Rich in flavor, it dries well, and may be grilled, or used in soups and stir frys.

Reishi is a name that encompasses several related species that are particularly immune enhancing, many of which grow in eastern North America, but not all of which are native. Ganoderma lucida is the classic Asian species known in China for over a thousand years, and it loves to grow on hardwoods, especially maple. Ganoderma tsugae is the North American variety, and it is usually found growing on hemlocks. Both tend to be a bit bitter when cooked in a soup, so they are often found in teas, tinctures and other extracts.

Important Safety Tip: NEVER wild forage mushrooms unless you are with a trusted and experienced expert who can guide you!! Luckily, most groceries now carry a delicious variety of mushrooms, including oyster, enoki, lions mane, shiitake, and maitake in addition to the typical crimini (and it’s mature version, Portabello).
... See MoreSee Less

This time of year, when the retreat of green foliage reveals the bones of our environment, and the usually hidden processes of damp decay, people start thinking about mushrooms. Technically, not being plants, mushrooms inhabit a gray area when it comes to the classic definition of herbs. But they are so rich in certain nutrients and nourishment that humans need (Vitamins B and D, potassium, selenium, polysaccharides and fiber), that they have been adopted into the herbal fold. 

Mushrooms live by breaking down dead plant matter, especially wood, and need lots of moisture to carry out their work. Often a particular species of mushroom will have a favorite dead tree that it likes to eat. But the part that we see, harvest and eat are actually just the fruit of the larger organism that lives unseen below the surface of the soil. That part is a network of thin fibers called mycelium, which can grow to acres in size. Mushrooms have fruiting seasons, just like trees and perennials. Which season depends on the specific mushroom, and can be anytime from early spring (Morels) to mid-summer (Shiitake) to mid-autumn (Maitake).   Some will re-fruit in later seasons, especially if year has been wet.

One of the benefits of eating mushrooms (which also makes them valuable going into cold weather), is their immune modulating properties. It doesn’t hurt that they taste so good in soups and other warm dishes like casseroles. 

Maitake (Grifola frondosa), also known as Hen of the Woods. This species likes oaks, especially red, and can often be spied on forest hikes. It is prized by wild foragers, and makes a great addition to omelets, simmered in cream soups or simply sautéed.  Maitake prefers cool wet weather for fruiting, so look for them early September through the fall, especially after rain.

Shiitake  (Lintinula edodes), also called the Black Forest Mushroom, is a popular mushroom in kits. Native to Asia, it also grows in the wild in North America. Rich in flavor, it dries well, and may be grilled, or used in soups and stir frys. 

Reishi is a name that encompasses several related species that are particularly immune enhancing, many of which grow in eastern North America, but not all of which are native. Ganoderma lucida is the classic Asian species known in China for over a thousand years, and it loves to grow on hardwoods, especially maple. Ganoderma tsugae is the North American variety, and it is usually found growing on hemlocks. Both tend to be a bit bitter when cooked in a soup, so they are often found in teas, tinctures and other extracts.

Important Safety Tip: NEVER wild forage mushrooms unless you are with a trusted and experienced expert who can guide you!! Luckily, most groceries now carry a delicious variety of mushrooms, including oyster, enoki, lions mane, shiitake, and maitake in addition to the typical crimini (and it’s mature version, Portabello).
Load more

Visit Us On FacebookVisit Us On Google PlusVisit Us On PinterestVisit Us On Youtube